Remembering August 25, 1619

By Bishop Peggy Johnson

“On August 25, 1619, the White Lion (pirate and slave ship) entered from the Chesapeake Bay and arrived at Point Comfort, an English settlement…at the mouth of the harbor, 20 nautical miles downstream from Jamestown (Va.).” (www.Project1619.org)  Thus began the scourge of slavery in this country that has continued on for 400 years.  

According to an article in the Sunday Tribune by Michael Coard, 12.5 million stolen Africans were brought to this country.  By the time of the Civil War there were 4 million enslaved people and 1.32 million of them were children.  

They were sold on slave blocks, treated inhumanely, and whole families were separated: “…mother from daughter, father from son, brother from sister, husband from wife. Following these forced separations, they were scattered across the country.  And they would never touch or even see one another again.” (Sunday Tribune, July 28, 2019, p 2-A)

It can well be said that the wealth and success of this country came on the backs of enslaved people.  Again citing Coard’s research: Of the 56 signers of the American colonies’ Declaration of Independence, 41 had slaves. Of the 55 signers of the U.S. Constitution, 25 owned slaves. One in six households had slaves in Philadelphia in the 1760’s, and even William Penn himself had three. George Washington had 316 slaves.

The Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 did little to improve the lot of enslaved people. And through the years the scourge of slavery has continued to wound and scar us through Jim Crow laws, stubborn racism and racial inequities, white privilege, white Nationalism and mass incarceration.  

August 25 is a date to acknowledge the grievous sins of this nation against not only slaves but also first-nation peoples. It is a time to also recognize the ongoing attacks on immigrants and migrants in this country.  

It is a time to remember and reflect on how the hunger for gain and material wealth has caused people to subjugate and enslave their fellow human beings. It is said well in one of our rarely sung hymns: “O shame to us who rest content while lust and greed for gain in street and shop and tenement wring gold from human pain.” (UM Book of Hymns, No. 726)

It is a time to commit the church—our church—to name racism when we see it, to work harder to achieve equality and shared leadership and wealth for all, to carefully monitor our elected officials and vote for those who have hearts of justice, and to promote laws that encourage reparations, affirmative action and fair voting rights, policies and alignment of districts. 

The road is long and the battle lines are deeply entrenched in this country presently. But each of us can do our part and together the Church of Jesus Christ can make a difference.  Start by praying this prayer at church on August 25.

“Stolen” is described as a collection of resources and engagements to commemorate the quad-centennial of the first of the African diaspora brought to the American colonies.

Gracious God of all people, we acknowledge and repent of the grievous acts of inhumanity against people of African descent in our long history.  We know that much generational wealth in this country has been in the hands of European-American people at the expense of people of color.  

Forgive us we pray and on this anniversary of 400 years of American slavery. We commit ourselves anew to work for justice, peace and equity.  Give us the strength to step out in faith to do our part. And give us the courage to face the persecution that comes with justice ministry. This we pray in the name of the lover of our souls and of all: Jesus, the Christ. Amen.


Learn more about this poignant anniversary of a momentous event in American history. Read “
Slavery anniversary leads to new discussions,” by Jim Patterson of UM News Service (July 8, 2019) 

Republished from The Bishop’s Blog.