Domestic Violence Awareness Month

By Bishop Peggy Johnson

Bear one another’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.  —Galatians 6:2

October is annually recognized as “Domestic Violence Awareness Month.”

Why? Because of some very shocking and disturbing statistics that more people should know and care about.

Every 9 seconds in the U.S. a woman is assaulted or beaten, according to www.domesticviolencestatistics.com,  a website dedicated to educating the public about this terrible scourge.

It’s a worldwide problem. In the U.S., 1 in 4, but globally, at least 1 in 3 women is beaten, coerced or abused during her lifetime. And based on reports from 10 countries, from 55 to 95 percent of women who have been physically abused by their partners have never contacted police, safety shelters or non-governmental organizations for help.

Thus, this problem, this burden, is far more devastating—to women, to families, to communities, to our nation and world—than we know.

So, October is annually recognized as Domestic Violence Awareness Month to shine a light on a very serious, painful but often hidden crisis in our world. In fact, the National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) recommends this week as a “Week of Action” in the campaign to end domestic violence.

This problem is not limited to only women. Many men and children are also victims of domestic violence. Sadly, it also happens in clergy families and in the homes of countless lay people in our congregations.

When I served in a local church years ago I was made aware of a serious abuse situation in the home of a family that lived near the church. When I became involved in an intervention I was fearful for my life as well as the life of this young mother and her two small children.

Fortunately for this family there was a local shelter available to help. But I learned quickly that such resources to address this kind of crisis were very limited.

The Eastern PA Conference is forming a Domestic Violence Task Force that we hope will become an official conference committee in the future. The purpose of this task force is to educate our churches about this staggering, hidden reality and to refer people to organizations, services and law enforcement officials who can help.

This is a compelling burden for us all to bear. We encourage churches to have conversations about Domestic Violence and to ask hard questions when anyone suspects that someone is being or has been abused.

We are our brother’s and sister’s keeper. So, we need to open the eyes and ears of our hearts and extend our hands and our voices to offer lifesaving relief.

Please search online for more information about domestic violence this month and learn what you and your church can do to shine the light of truth and healing on this widespread problem. And please let us know what your church is doing or plans to do. Thank you.

NOTE: Hopewell UMC (852 Hopewell Road, Downingtown, PA) will host Strengthening Families throughout the Faith Community, “an engaging conference for church ministers, staff and lay leaders,” on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 1:30 to 6:30 PM. This experience will educate concerned participants about ways churches can connect with community resources to support domestic violence survivors and their children.

The Domestic Violence Center of Chester County (DVCCC) will facilitate the seminar. The cost is $15, and participants will receive three useful resources:

  • DVCCC’s The Faith Community Response to Domestic Violence Toolkit
  • The FaithTrust Institute’s Community Resource Inventory Map
  • The Phoenixville Community Health Foundation’s Help Book 5

Please register online today. For information call Courtney, of DVCCC, at 610-431-3546, ext. 134. (0.4 CEU certificates are available.) Download the flyer.

Also, here are links to other recent articles and a video

… about challenging and helping the church, and men in particular, to offer a faithful response to domestic violence:

United Methodist Men take on domestic violence by Julie Dwyer (UMNS)
The leadership of the Commission on United Methodist Men recognizes that ending violence against women begins with men. The United Methodist general agency is partnering with AMEND Together, an initiative of the YWCA of Nashville and Middle Tennessee dedicated to ending violence against women and girls. The partnership features an eight-week group series aimed at United Methodist men (that)… aligns perfectly with United Methodist Men’s mission to support spiritual growth among men. Learn more…

NBA Star Asks Men To End Domestic Violence
Former pro basketball player Shan Foster has seen acts of violence around the world. He now works to end domestic violence by creating safe spaces for men of all ages to learn about healthy manhood and to discuss their emotions. AMEND Together, a program of the YWCA of Nashville and Middle Tennessee, and the United Methodist Men have a new partnership that is providing an 8-week group series that will teach men to recognize, respond to and prevent violence against women. Learn more…

Domestic Violence Awareness Month by Susan Greer Burton, UM Church and Society
October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. To understand domestic violence, we have to begin to look in — into our behaviors, into our families, into our churches, into our communities and into the policies that impact women and families. Learn more…

Domestic violence: We want our churches to be talking about it by Joe Iovino (UMNS)
Introducing a webinar slideshow presentation that church leaders can download for free and use with their congregations. “Articulating our Theology: Domestic Violence” explores ways United Methodist churches and individuals can work to eliminate domestic violence and minister to victims and survivors.Learn more…


Republished from The Bishop’s Blog