Eclipse 2017: A moment in time

by Bishop Peggy Johnson

If you haven’t heard we are expecting a “Great American Eclipse” on August 21.  The moon will pass across the sun in such a way that the sun will be blocked for a short time. All that many will see is the corona, or crown, of the sun peaking out behind the moon.

This will occur across the continental United States, where we will be able to see varying degrees of darkness, depending on where we live. Those residing in areas along a diagonal path that stretches from Oregon to South Carolina will be able to witness this phenomena in its fullness, with the moon blocking the sun completely. In the Northeast, our view of the eclipse will occur in the afternoon.

A solar eclipse to this degree has not occurred in the United States since June 8, 1918. But there have been many other eclipses through the years.

According to The Scientific American (August 11, 2017), an eclipse is a great opportunity for scientists to study the sun by examining the corona as the moon passes by. That radiant crown is described as “ethereal wisps of superheated plasma.” It can best be seen during an eclipse, although scientists can study the sun at other times as well.

During this brief window of opportunity, “eclipse scientists” will examine the magnetic field of the sun, test next-generation technologies, create thermal maps and learn about the chemistry of the corona and what makes it heat up. All of this must happen in a short span of time. They must be prepared and use their time well.

The Apostle Paul speaks about time in Ephesians 5:16. He encourages us to “be very careful how you live, not as unwise but as wise, making the most of every opportunity because the days are evil.”

Indeed, time, like the eclipse, flies by us, and we must not delay in doing the things that God has called us to do while we have the chance to do them. We do not always get a second opportunity to do that act of kindness, make that contribution, encourage a friend, or share our faith with someone who is struggling. Every delay can lead to more delays, and every lost opportunity is a lost blessing.

What have you been putting off that needs to be done? Who is God nudging you to contact?  Don’t put it off.  As Jesus said, “As long as it is day, I must do the works of him who sent me. Night is coming, when no one can work.” (John 9:4).

Make the most of your gift of time and precious opportunities today!

Republished from the Bishop’s Blog.


How to look at the eclipse without burning your eyes

Sunglasses are not nearly strong enough. Filters made from food wrappers and other household materials? Also a bad idea. Even masks designed for gas welding are not going to cut it.

For the millions planning to watch the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, ophthalmologists say proper eye protection is essential. Staring at the sun — even when three-quarters of it is blocked by the moon, as it will be in much of Pennsylvania and New Jersey — can damage eyesight. Read more